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I Don't Eat Things With Eyes! by Teresa Hanley (Illustrated by Daniel Wimberley)

I know, I know; there should be a law against me contributing to the education or amusement of children. Alas, there isn't. I'm very grateful for the opportunity to work with the very talented Teresa Hanley on her debut children's book, I Don't Eat Things With Eyes! Not only is it a first for her, it's my first time illustrating a children's book.

From the heart of a teacher, I Don't Eat Things With Eyes! is the perfect book to teach your child about the importance of diversity, courage and conviction. Ped the vegetarian python struggles to balance his personal convictions with a desire to please others. Delight in Ped's victory as he finds the courage to stand by his personal beliefs despite the social pressure to fit in.


Author Spotlight in the Tulsa World

Owasso resident and longtime author Daniel Wimberley has released his third book, “The Wandering Tree,” a religious/visionary fiction.

By Art Haddaway, News Editor

The 427-page book is a coming-of-age story that follows the life of an impoverished teenager named Lincoln – a wounded soul – who is transformed through his encounters with an Elm tree in a hay field behind his home.

Lincoln spends his early childhood playing in the field, but as he gets older and the challenges of life become more difficult, he seeks refuge under the tree, where he finds hope to believe in a better life.

“The Wandering Tree” takes readers through Lincoln’s journey of pain and hardship that continues leading him back to the tree, which ultimately challenges his thinking and changes the way he sees the world – and himself.

“The tree is very symbolic … it is very much a metaphor for persevering despite circumstances and sacrifice,” Wimberley said. “Over the course of the book, Lincoln’s childhood connection to the tree emerges as something much more than he imagined.”

Wimberley said although the story has a defined spiritual component – addressing divorce, suicide and homosexuality – the tree puts Lincoln at odds with organized religion and forces him to confront the loose ends of his beliefs.

» Read the full article


The Wandering Tree: A Strewn Field Tale

A spellbinding coming-of-age tale...

Poverty has a way of stripping childhood of its dignity, a fact of life that Lincoln Chase knows all too well. Wearing thrift store clothes, praying to the gods of adolescence that some loud-mouthed kid doesn't recognize his old shirt. Building up firewood reserves while other boys are out popping fly balls without a care in the world. It's a relentless condition without a single redeeming quality.

Of course, being poor is something that Lincoln has had time to accept. That his father is a convicted murderer, on the other hand... well, that's a fresh wound that'll take some getting used to. And soon enough it'll be the least of his problems.

Yet all is not lost. Because in a long neglected hayfield, something extraordinary is happening—something so contrary to human thinking that the rules of possibility begin to unravel. And for a boy like Lincoln, it doesn't merely change the way he sees the world.

It changes everything.

»2017 Kindle Book Awards Finalist in Literary Fiction
»2017 International Book Awards Finalist in Religious Fiction
»2017 Oklahoma Book Awards Finalist in Fiction
»2016 Best Book Finalist in both Visionary Fiction and Religious Fiction


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